Jonathan Edgecombe

Astrophotography

Veil Nebula

Imaging lens: Canon FD 200mm f/2.8
Imaging camera: ZWO ASI174MM
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro
Guide scope: Skywatcher ST80
Guide camera: ZWO ASI034MC

Light frames:
Baader 2" 7nm Ha: 73x 300s 10°c 64 gain, 47 offset
Total exposure: 6 hours 5 minutes

The Veil Nebula is a cloud of heated and ionized gas and dust in the constellation Cygnus. It constitutes the visible portions of the Cygnus Loop (radio source W78, or Sharpless 103), a large but relatively faint supernova remnant. The source supernova exploded circa 3,000 BC to 6,000 BC, and the remnants have since expanded to cover an area roughly 3 degrees in diameter (about 6 times the diameter, or 36 times the area, of the full moon). The distance to the nebula is not precisely known, but current data suggests a distance of about 1,470 light-years. [w]

Pinwheel Galaxy

Imaging lens: AT65EDQ
Imaging camera: Canon EOS M
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro
Guide scope: Skywatcher ST80
Guide camera: ZWO ASI174MM

Light frames: 29x 600s
Total exposure: 4 hours 50 minutes

The Pinwheel Galaxy (also known as Messier 101, M101 or NGC 5457) is a face-on spiral galaxy distanced 21 million light-years (six megaparsecs) away from earth in the constellation Ursa Major. First discovered by Pierre Méchain on March 27, 1781, it was communicated to Charles Messier who verified its position for inclusion in the Messier Catalogue as one of its final entries. [w]

Whirlpool Galaxy

Imaging lens: AT65EDQ
Imaging camera: Canon EOS M
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro
Guide scope: Skywatcher ST80
Guide camera: ZWO ASI174MM

Light frames: 65x 300s
Total exposure: 5 hours 25 minutes

The Whirlpool Galaxy, also known as Messier 51a, M51a, or NGC 5194, is an interacting grand-design spiral galaxy with a Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus in the constellation Canes Venatici. It was the first galaxy to be classified as a spiral galaxy. Recently it was estimated to be 23 ± 4 million light-years from the Milky Way, but different methods yield distances between 15 and 35 million light-years. [w]

Crescent Nebula

Imaging lens: Canon FD 200mm f/2.8
Imaging camera: ZWO ASI174MM
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro
Guide scope: Skywatcher ST80
Guide camera: ZWO ASI034MC

Light frames:
Baader 2" 7nm Ha: 17x 300s 10°c 32 gain, 47 offset
Total exposure: 1 hour 25 minutes

The Crescent Nebula (also known as NGC 6888, Caldwell 27, Sharpless 105) is an emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus, about 5000 light-years away from Earth. It was discovered by Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel in 1792. It is formed by the fast stellar wind from the Wolf-Rayet star WR 136 (HD 192163) colliding with and energizing the slower moving wind ejected by the star when it became a red giant around 250,000 to 400,000 years ago. The result of the collision is a shell and two shock waves, one moving outward and one moving inward. The inward moving shock wave heats the stellar wind to X-ray-emitting temperatures. [w]

Andromeda Galaxy

Imaging lens: AT65EDQ
Imaging camera: Canon EOS M
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro
Guide scope: Skywatcher ST80
Guide camera: ZWO ASI174MM

Light frames: 18x 600s
Total exposure: 3 hours

The Andromeda Galaxy, also known as Messier 31, M31, or NGC 224, is a spiral galaxy approximately 780 kiloparsecs (2.5 million light-years) from Earth. It is the nearest major galaxy to the Milky Way and was often referred to as the Great Andromeda Nebula in older texts. It received its name from the area of the sky in which it appears, the constellation of Andromeda, which was named after the mythological princess Andromeda. Being approximately 220,000 light years across, it is the largest galaxy of the Local Group, which also contains the Milky Way, the Triangulum Galaxy, and about 44 other smaller galaxies. Despite earlier findings that suggested that the Milky Way contains more dark matter and could be the largest in the grouping, the 2006 observations by the Spitzer Space Telescope revealed that Andromeda contains one trillion (1012) stars: at least twice the number of stars in the Milky Way, which is estimated to be 200–400 billion. [w]

Leo Triplet

Imaging lens: AT65EDQ
Imaging camera: Canon EOS M
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro
Guide scope: Skywatcher ST80
Guide camera: ZWO ASI174MM

Light frames: 43x 300s
Total exposure: 3 hours 35 minutes

The Leo Triplet (also known as the M66 Group) is a small group of galaxies about 35 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. This galaxy group consists of the spiral galaxies M65, M66, and NGC 3628. [w]

Sadr Region

Imaging lens: Canon FD 200mm f/2.8
Imaging camera: ZWO ASI174MM
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro
Guide scope: Skywatcher ST80
Guide camera: ZWO ASI034MC

Light frames:
Baader 2" 7nm Ha: 12x 300s 10°c 64 gain, 47 offset
Total exposure: 1 hour

The Sadr region, or IC 1318, is the diffuse emission nebula surrounding Sadr or Gamma Cygni. Sadr lies in the center of Cygnus's cross. The Sadr region is one of the surrounding nebulous regions; others include the Butterfly Nebula and the Crescent Nebula. It contains many dark nebulae in addition to the emission diffuse nebulae. [w]

North America & Pelican Nebulae

Imaging lens: Canon FD 200mm f/2.8
Imaging camera: ZWO ASI174MM
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro
Guide scope: Skywatcher ST80
Guide camera: ZWO ASI034MC

Light frames:
Baader 2" 7nm Ha: 24x 300s 5°c 64 gain, 47 offset
Total exposure: 2 hours

The North America Nebula (NGC 7000 or Caldwell 20) is an emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus, close to Deneb (the tail of the swan and its brightest star). The remarkable shape of the nebula resembles that of the continent of North America, complete with a prominent Gulf of Mexico. [w]
The Pelican Nebula (also known as IC 5070 and IC 5067) is an H II region associated with the North America Nebula in the constellation Cygnus. The gaseous contortions of this emission nebula bear a resemblance to a pelican, giving rise to its name. The Pelican Nebula is located nearby first magnitude star Deneb, and is divided from its more prominent neighbour, the North America Nebula, by a molecular cloud filled with dark dust. The Pelican is much studied because it has a particularly active mix of star formation and evolving gas clouds. The light from young energetic stars is slowly transforming cold gas to hot and causing an ionization front gradually to advance outward. Particularly dense filaments of cold gas are seen to still remain, and among these are found two jets emitted from the Herbig–Haro object 555. Millions of years from now this nebula might no longer be known as the Pelican, as the balance and placement of stars and gas will leave something that appears completely different. [w]

Heart Nebula

Imaging lens: Canon FD 200mm f/2.8
Imaging camera: ZWO ASI174MM
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro
Guide scope: Skywatcher ST80
Guide camera: ZWO ASI034MC

Light frames:
Baader 2" 7nm Ha: 24x 300s 5°c 64 gain, 47 offset
Total exposure: 2 hours

The Heart Nebula, IC 1805, Sharpless 2-190, lies some 7500 light years away from Earth and is located in the Perseus Arm of the Galaxy in the constellation Cassiopeia. This is an emission nebula showing glowing gas and darker dust lanes. The nebula is formed by plasma of ionized hydrogen and free electrons. The very brightest part of this nebula (the knot at the right) is separately classified as NGC 896, because it was the first part of this nebula to be discovered. [w]